If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site

22 Old Short Hills Road
Suite 214
Livingston, NJ 07039

Blog

Monday, 10 December 2018 00:00

Two Types of Heel Spurs

A condition that is known as a heel spur may present itself in two different categories. One of them is often referred to as heel spur syndrome and is characterized by bony protrusions that form on the bottom of the heel. They may look like a small hook and will grow toward the plantar fascia. This may develop as a result of repeated tearing of the heel bone lining, in addition to straining the ligaments and muscles of the foot. Patients may develop insertional Achilles tendonitis as a form of a heel spur, and this will typically occur where the heel bone connects to the Achilles tendon. If the Achilles tendon becomes irritated and inflamed, severe pain and discomfort may often accompany this condition. This type of heel spur may form as a result of decreased ankle motion and is known to develop gradually. If you are experiencing a heel spur, it is advised to seek the expert knowledge of a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact one of our podiatrists from Essex Podiatry Associates. Our doctors will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main conditions spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our office located in Livingston, NJ. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

Read more about How to Treat Heel Spurs
Monday, 03 December 2018 00:00

Three Areas of Peripheral Neuropathy

Patients who are afflicted with peripheral neuropathy are typically familiar with a tingling sensation or numbness in their feet that generally accompanies this uncomfortable condition. Additional symptoms may include difficulty in walking, feeling a stabbing pain that may be in the feet, or experiencing muscle weakness. Research has shown the peripheral nerves are categorized into three areas. One group is known as the motor nerves and will affect performing activities that may include walking or picking up an object. Additionally, sensory nerves affect the ability to differentiate between hot and cold, or objects that are smooth or rough. Finally, autonomic nerves control specific functions of the body, which may include digestion, heart rate, and blood pressure. If you are experiencing symptoms in the feet that may indicate neuropathy, it is suggested to consult with a podiatrist, so a proper diagnosis can be performed.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with one of our podiatrists from Essex Podiatry Associates. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be trigged by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy, whether it be diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, or others, will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Livingston, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Neuropathy
Connect with us